CARTERS Commercial Project Award Results

H T M L Code
National Category Winner: CARTERS Commercial

Project: Stewart Dawson's Corner Redevelopment

Entrant

McKee Fehl Constructors

Project Partners

335 (Architect/Designer), Architecture Plus Ltd (Architect/Designer), Beca (Engineer), Benmax (Engineer), BlackYard Engineering (Engineer), CORA (Architect/Designer), McKee Fehl Constructors (Construction Company), Michael Stretton Ltd (Engineer)

Owned By

Argosy Property (No.1) Limited

The Stewart Dawson Corner project began in 2018 and has undergone multiple design iterations, scope changes, and budget increases. The redevelopment includes 13,000m2 of quality office and retail space, revitalising the existing buildings across the two adjacent sites. This development was one of the first buildings in New Zealand to incorporate Fluid Viscous Dampers (FVDs), sourced from Taylor Devices in San Francisco. These dampers strengthened the building to 130% NBS, ensuring its ability to withstand seismic events. Located on one of the busiest corners in Wellington, Willis Street and Lambton Quay, the project had several restrictions to overcome. There was limited space on-site for storage and parking, requiring careful planning, sequencing, and management of both vehicle and pedestrian traffic. It stands as an example of exceptional engineering, design, and project management, contributing to the ongoing growth and development of Wellington's central business district.

Judges comments

 

Project: 40 Bowen Street

Entrant

LT McGuinness

Project Partners

Dunning Thornton (Engineer), Norman Disney & Young (Engineer), Precinct Properties (Project Manager), Tennent Brown Architects (Architect/Designer), Warren and Mahoney Architects (Architect/Designer)

Owned By

LT McGuinness

40 Bowen St is a new eight-storey office building in Parliament precinct and is home to a number of premium tenants. The structure features unique engineering innovations, such as Fluid Viscous Dampers, which act like shock absorbers in the event of an earthquake - a first for Wellington. Sustainability was at the forefront of this build, having achieved a carbon-zero status and a 5 Green Star certification. The carbon-footprint of materials were tracked and significant effort was made to source these from sustainable suppliers. 40 Bowen St was consented and due to be built at the same time as 44 Bowen St, but the latter was delayed due to Covid-related economic pressures. The design and build team expertly managed this and adapted their plans to manage the uncertainty. Both properties are now complete.

 

Project: Site 9 Redevelopment

Entrant

L T McGuinness

Project Partners

Athfield Architects Ltd (Architect/Designer), CORA (Engineer), Dunning Thornton (Engineer), Willis Bond (Owner/Developer)

Located on the Wellington waterfront, Site 9’s design draws on historical maritime context and contributes to the emerging contemporary character of the Kumutoto Precinct. Despite the many challenges of designing and constructing a building on a difficult and restricted site, the project team managed to deliver a premium office building in a prime location. The building boasts a unique seismic design with an isolation plane located under the first level. This was a necessary cost saving feature, which avoided the construction of a basement or secondary foundation layer below the water table. It also significantly reduced construction costs and saved time on the build program. The pandemic required innovative changes to the way the project teams communicated. To coordinate design and construction work, Zoom was used extensively. It also enabled 3D BIM coordination in real time between consultants and contractors across the country, who were limited by travel restrictions.

 

Project: CDC Data Centre, Silverdale

Entrant

NZ Strong Group

Project Partners

NZ Strong Group Limited (Construction Company), Williams Architects Ltd (Architect/Designer)

This project is New Zealand’s first Hyperscale Data Centre, which will be used for mass data storage for the world’s largest organisations. It brought a global model to New Zealand shores which increased the technical performance of the build team as well as the quality of the end result. Security was paramount in the build. The facility is constructed to the second highest level of security available, and all involved in the construction had to meet a strict set of standards. Other advance features included cooling management, power backup systems and fire stopping measures. Sustainability was essential to the build. The centre uses 100% renewable electricity, has a closed loop water cooling system to minimise water usage, and CLT was used above door heads to avoid the use of concrete.

 

Project: St John National Call Centre Resilience Project

Entrant

Accent Construction

Project Partners

Accent Construction Interiors Ltd (Construction Company), Ignite Architects (Architect/Designer), WSP (Engineer)

An existing building was upgraded to provide the St John Ambulance National 111 Critical Call Centre with a new facility designed to provide uninterrupted services in the event of an emergency or natural disaster. This involved significant upgrades to the infrastructure, an interior fit out, and structural and seismic strengthening of the building. A standout feature of this project was the team's ability to meet the highly technical and specific needs of the client. A collaborative approach was adopted which meant that representatives from St John were involved in all elements of planning and decision-making. The design team and construction team also established relationships where they were able to constructively challenge each other to achieve the best technical outcomes.

 

Project: Takiri South

Entrant

Holmes Construction NZ

Project Partners

Buchan Group (Architect/Designer), Holmes Construction NZ (Construction Company), Maltbys (Quantity Surveyor), TSA (Project Manager)

This two-storey commercial building is part of the Coastlands shopping complex and hosts both retail and office space. Sustainable choices were made throughout the design and build stages. Timber framing was used instead of metal, and structural steel was the preferred choice over concrete. In cases where concrete was necessary, fibre cement sheets made with recycled fibre were used. Grey glass was selected throughout the building to reduce solar heat gain and light transmission, which in turns assist in reducing the power required for heating and cooling the building. Despite the challenges posed by COVID-19, this project was completed almost entirely during the pandemic. The peak of which coincided with the frames of the building going up, which was impacted by issues related to labour and material supply. Inclement weather created additional problems, with the timber framing getting extremely wet and needing special attention to dry out in a timely manner to allow the project to keep moving forward.